Saturday, July 18, 2009

Ditch Lily

is parent to the modern daylily. The first recorded planting of the tawny daylily in the United States was in 1793. It became the ultimate pass-along plant and by the early 20Th century was so commonly found in wild places it was often assumed to be native. Surprisingly the plant is sterile and almost never sets seed pods so it's widespread distribution is the handiwork of gardeners. It produces a foot long stolon ( a modified stem) so plants scamper about the garden as they seek new places to run. Thus ditch lily is an aggressive competitor.

8 comments:

W. Latane Barton said...

They are too pretty to be living in a ditch.

Mildred said...

We see so many of these we often forget just how beautiful and special they are. From your photograph, it is just amazing the intricacy of the coloring in the center!

Renie Burghardt said...

So pretty! And I learned something new as well.

Happy weekend!

Hugs,

Renie

Lynne (lynnesgiftsfromtheheart) said...

I didn't know they actually had a name. I remember seeing them along the country sides for years until the state started spraying for weeds. I love your new header picture, so peaceful...nothing like the country to take a person away from their troubles and woes..I hope you're having a super w/k.. hugs ~lynne~

Sara said...

It has beautiful colors...my favorites are the warmer colors.

Hocking Hills Gardener said...

What wonderful facts on the ditch lily. I just figured they spread by seed or root. I love seeing them along the roads.

Darla said...

Good info here.

Winifred said...

Never heard of this one. It's lovely for a wild flower.